Lemuel Showell Blades, Attorney at Law

I am a lawyer in a one-man law firm who has to utilize a variety of marketing concepts, technology and information for day-to-day operations. I have wanted a website because, while it may not now be the main source for client development, I see it as a source that is growing every year. Also, I can use it to give potential clients and clients a resource to which they can turn to answer many basic questions, thus keeping my staff and me focused on real problems and work instead of having us be mere information-givers; not to replace us, but to help us. It also will help me achieve my next goal which is going paperless. Finally, I wanted to increase my marketing and having a website seems integral to that.

RevenFlo was recommended to me by my I.T. guy and Jason’s office happened to be next door to mine. I appreciated his easy style mixed with his professionalism, and the way he seemed to understand my goals and articulate himself in a non-condescending manner, which is impossible for so many technology folks.

I hired RevenFlo basically to review the marketing plan I had set down on paper and was impressed with his comments on each item. Jason came up with the concept of branding my firm, which was branded in my mind but was not put out there to the public as forcefully as it was set in my mind. It was apparent that I had never fully utilized my focusing on one area of law, bankruptcy, as a marketing tool and had never had having a tagline and a logo in my marketing plan. I had just never thought about practicing and marketing the law that way, although in reality, it seems that every major or growing law firm in SC brands itself in this manner.

I had RevenFlo design my website and we set forth a design objective containing the information and type of components I wanted in it: specifically, I wanted something extremely user-friendly which was full of actual information and not just an electronic yellow-page ad. It also had to have links to other sites, maps to courthouses, photos of courthouses and office folks, a blog which I can use easily (Jason convinced me of the importance of a blog in my site’s Google-ability); a video people could download and watch; and forms they could download and use with Adobe Acrobat. Finally, it had to be able to be easily modified to incorporate law and form changes, and to one day include more interactive forms so that, as some highly-advanced law firms have, I could add a cyberspace office, whereby clients could meet me on-line, via email or videoconferencing, and we could exchange forms in that process.

After a few drafts and revisions, we had a design and, when Jason wasn’t happy with the design, he scrapped it all and went back to the drawing board, none of which cost me more than our contract price. After he explained it all to me in language I can understand (but not repeat here), we settled on a mix of numerous cutting edge web 2.0 css technologies incorporating youtube, geomaps, adobe, search-ability, client-editing capabilities, etc.

My rudimentary understanding of it all is that the use of these technologies allows potential clients to contact me via my site/email, and we utilize third parties from which my site obtains information as part of the site (e.g. youtube and the maps) and the css technology allows me to change about anything I want when I want as far as editing goes, without having to change the coding or calling RevenFlo. And the use of the third parties exponentially increases my exposure to the cybercommunity, as my site has the potential to be linked and connected and Googled via its connection to those third parties. For example, my secretary searched YouTube for bankruptcy lawyer and my video on my site comes up as the only one on there.

We launched 2 weeks ago and it is too early to tell if this will actually increase market share, but I think it accomplishes every other goal I set, due to Revenflo’s design and advice. I am very pleased and have recommended RevenFlo to lots and lots of people. And, oh yeah, Jason will let you try to save money and take your own photographs but, in the end, you probably will be better off paying for the professional photos like I did after he had humored me by actually putting the photos I took on the website first.